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Some of you already know that I spent the last couple of weeks recovering from knee surgery (ruptured meniscus, long story, don’t ask ;)). So far, the knee has been healing nicely, just as it ought to, and I’m glad to report that with each day I am feeling more and more like my usual self again.

Probably the weirdest after-effect: I never would have thought that I would be so fucking happy about being able to empty the dishwasher on my own again.

Also, my fannish mojo is coming back. Even though I’m not quite sure what to contribute at the moment, I’m quite happy to read along and enjoy what others are posting! :)

A good deal of my own fannish thoughts are still circling around OuaT 's Jekyll and Hyde plot, by the way. Representations of duality, repression, denial and most of all how Sam Witwer’s Hyde in “Strange Case” struck me as so much more straightforward and in tune with himself and his surroundings than his counterpart Jekyll could ever be.

There is this one brief moment when the newly-created Hyde is seeing himself in the mirror for the very first time shortly before entering the ballroom, that is full of self-realisation, recognition and amazement. I just love the way in which, throughout the following scenes, the particular combination of setting and writing plus various acting and directing choices, is transforming Hyde from villain into romantic anti-hero, without sacrificing one bit of the character’s inherent ruthlessness.

Well done, show! But now, if you could only please devote as much care and attention to your major story arcs as you are paying attention to the details… ;)

As for the afore mentioned Harry Potter rec:

More or less on a whim, Cavendish and I rewatched the first three Harry Potter movies (all of them have aged suprisingly well, though the Alfonso Cuarón one still rules), which led to me searching the AO3 for a bit of HP fanfic. And look what I have found thanks to the archive’s advanced filtering options and a little bit of beginner’s luck:

The Nicest Word There Is…  by Droupy48
Summary: A story about the kids who felt safe in the library.
Word count: 2161
Rating: G
Characters: Minerva McGonagall, Remus Lupin, Hermione Granger

A beautifully written, quiet character piece providing great insights into each character. However, on a more abstract and serious level, this story is as much a story about young McGonagall, Lupin and Hermione Granger as it is a story about the different faces of discrimination and the power of reading.

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/75385.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: cheerfulcheerful
28 July 2016 @ 10:52 am
Safely returned from the north-eastern Highlands and having a ton of laundry to deal with.

More detailed holiday report will follow, once Cavendish and I have gone through what feels like a gazillion of pictures ;-)

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/75072.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: busybusy
01 July 2016 @ 01:02 pm

The dialogue on Once upon a Time may not always be perfect, but there is this delightful line, spoken by Rumplestilstkin, that magic always comes with a price. It’s wonderfully catchy and universal, quite applicable to a lot of things, actually. Being the information junkie that I am, I would never have thought, though, that trying to keep up with the Brexit and its consequences would be one of those pricey things.

Some of you already know that I work in adult education, teaching everything from basic travel English to conversational English, and also British (sometimes Scottish) life and culture to a bunch of open-minded, interested and simply fantastic people, most of them in the 55+ age group, although the folks in the evening classes usually tend to be a bit on the younger side.

So spending the better part of last week discussing the various aspects of the Brexit, professionally but also with family and friends, was exactly what I had expected. What I hadn’t reckoned with, however, was how bloody exhausting these discussions would be, because I am emotionally involved.

In essence, the British Isles aren’t a foreign country to me but rather my holiday home in Europe. I’ve been travelling the UK ever since I was sixteen. Over the years, I’ve consumed more than my share of British culture, literature, history and media; I’ve formed friendships and regularly exchange Christmas cards.

Among my favourite TV people ever are David Attenborough, Simon Schama and Jim Al-Khalili. And if fellow Doctor Who fans inquire about my favourite Doctor, I’ll proudly say it’s the Fifth. (I only caught up with classic DW after the new series had started, and while I’ve seen every classic Doctor in action by now, Fivey is the one I really clicked with on every level, which is kind of sweet, because due to his early 1980s run, Peter Davison’s Doctor would have been the one I had imprinted on as a child if I had grown up in the UK.)

Despite the fact that I certainly think, feel, act and sound unmistakably German in everyday life, it is therefore no wonder that a large part of my personal identity is determined through what I love about the UK.

I would hate to see these ties substantially weakened, due to the bureaucratic complications that are likely to ensue now. Following media reports and political commentaries feels like a trip to some clownish, nonsensical and ugly bizzarro world.

The reports on the rising number of racist attacks on immigrants from other EU countries are leaving me shocked.

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/74999.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: nauseatednauseated
22 June 2016 @ 02:07 pm

Broken Crown by Zurik 23M. Grand and intense, with powerful emotions at work. And yet at the same time quite intricate.

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/74721.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: bouncybouncy
10 June 2016 @ 12:39 pm

Apparently someone at our local community-run indie cinema possesses a certain wicked sense of humour. Two showings of Jaws , one in German, one in English, right at the start of bathing season.

Of course, Cavendish and I went to see. Jaws is one of the movies that I know by heart and will never cease to admire because of how skillfully it was filmed. By a director who, at that time, was still a relative newcomer to the business and hadn’t even reached thirty years of age.

One aspect I have never realised before, though. (And here comes the amusing part): Matt Hooper, the youthful marine biologist played by Richard Dreyfuss, is Dana Scully. Totally. Just think about it.

  • Comparatively small and soft-featured person
  • Extremely smart and competent in their field
  • Strong belief in science, rationality, technology and proper equipment
  • Able to hold their own in a macho surrounding, while not necessarily subscribing to hyper-masculine ideals themselves
  • Coming to town to fight monsters
  • The second they utter their first line of dialogue you know they are cool.
  • And then there is that autopsy scene where Hooper cuts up a shark that isn’t the shark…
This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/74437.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: amusedamused
07 June 2016 @ 09:38 am
I guess, I was never really satisfied with how the Underworld arc depicted hope as just a handful of blossoming flowers. So I sat down and wrote...

Not Fade Away by Bimo (500 words)

Fandom: Once upon a Time
Rating: G
Summary: Change has come to the Underworld and Milah can feel it.
Characters: Milah, Liam Jones
Thanks to: The wonderful folks who encouraged me when I wrote the first draft version of this little piece, and Epona610 for volunteering to proofread :-)

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/74233.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished
05 June 2016 @ 02:04 pm

The things that enter your guestroom once you are approaching middle age and realise how catastrophically out of shape you have become …


[personal profile] selenak , I think this acquisition can be blamed on you, at least partly. When we were in Bamberg, there was a crosstrainer in our hotel. Cavendish and I both tried it and decided we liked it so much that we had to get one of these things of our own. ;-)


This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/73767.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: amusedamused
31 May 2016 @ 12:29 pm

From the description text of an exhibition I went to see at the Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg:

From 27 February, 2016: Liquid Identities – Lynn Hershman Leeson. Identities in the 21st Century

“Digital identity”, “patchwork identity”, “multiple identities”, these are all terms and constructs we use in our attempts to approach the complex question of “Who am I?”: Under digital conditions identity is no longer a fixed constant. Permanently in flow, it is contingent on a multitude of changing factors, the most influential of which are the presentation and communication opportunities offered by the Internet today.

Hershman Leeson’s art is fascinating, and many of her works eerie and unsettling.

Also at the Lehmbruck as an accompanying exhibition: Jakub Nepras - State of Flux

Rushing and fleeting. Hovering, static. Organic. The most otherworldly and transient light effects. I feel privileged to have seen these in real life. Needless to say the picture below doesn’t do the actual experience any justice.


Jakub Nepras: Landscape, videosculpture with sound, photo by Martin Polak, artist’s archive

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/73481.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
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Current Mood: relaxedrelaxed
19 May 2016 @ 02:13 pm

Just an idea from that split second before analytical thinking kicks in and kindly informs me that I’m chasing impossible butterflies, because OuaT and Neil Gaiman’s Sandman universe are really not all that compatible.

I’ve been nursing the thought before. There is this half-overheard conversation I have in my head. Two of Gaiman’s Endless (a family of timeless entities embodying universal concepts), the sisters Despair and Desire looking down on Killian Jones during his Neverland years, and discussing to whom of them he ultimately belongs. So far, so much for private fantasies and head!canons.

But now that OuaT has added an officially introduced “Realm of Untold Stories” to its evergrowing list of fictional worlds I’m beginning to wonder. What if they all, the various realms and everybody within them, every forest, castle, mountain, mouse and man were actually part of the Dreaming?

Sounds weird, yes? However it would account for quite a lot of the things going on. This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/73328.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: pensivepensive
13 May 2016 @ 11:20 am

Negative stuff first, just to get it out of the way:

No matter how much I used to enjoy Castle, after all the news and rumours surrounding the departure of Stana Katic, I am actually relieved that ABC has finally decided to cancel the show.

There is this conversation I had with [personal profile] selenak a while ago, about series being continued well past their natural expiration date, that ideal, non-realized stopping point at which plotlines could have come to a satisfying conclusion and the characters full-circle. With Castle, that point would have been reached at the end of season 7 by latest, I guess, with Beckett’s impending promotion and a lot of personal growth for both her and Castle himself. It was back then, when both Cavendish and I decided to quit and let these two characters ride off into an imagined sunset, so we would be able to remember them fondly.

And this is exactly what I will do now.

Salute a show that I followed for over one hundred fifty episodes. Here’s to cast and crew, to the fun-to-watch character dynamics. To a plethora of criminal cases ranging from serious, over bizarre, to simply hilarious.

One of the things I liked best was how shamelessly self-indulgent Castle played with the boundaries of its genre. As audience you never knew what you would get. Thriller, film noir, romantic comedy, western, mystery, sometimes even sci-fi. Also bona fide B-Team action adventures with Detectives Ryan and Esposito. Almost as if the show wanted to acknowledge its own fannishness by being playful.

One of my fanfic stories, a little Once upon a Time/Castle crossover would never have worked, if Beckett, in addition to being simply gorgeous, competent and smart, hadn’t also been such a huge, canon-confirmed fangirl. I had so much fun writing her from Hook’s point of view.

Thank you, Castle, for being such an occasionally weird and goofy fun ride. You were one hell of a show.

Kate Beckett, back in the Enchanted Forest, you would have been royal.

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/73187.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
Current Mood: calmcalm