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05 October 2003 @ 06:09 pm
Random Notes - Varying Significance  
Today's definition of the term "luck": Spilling the entire content of your XL-sized coffee mug over your writing desk without one single drop of liquid hitting your keyboard (it's the fourth, btw.; keyboards fear me, I'm their doom *g*)

But back to the bundle of disconnected notes that I came here for...


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cavendish's entry about Re-Unification Day, incorrigible teenage idealism and the importance of hopeful Utopias not only re-awakened my love for the groundbreaking qualities of Star Trek: Classic , it also caused me to wonder about the representation of humanist values in current Sci-Fi/Genre TV.

The most obvious finding: We clearly live in a "Post X-Files" age now. Where Roddenberry's Federation of Planets postulated the benefits of scientific advance, peaceful exploration and tolerance, the Federation officers of Joss Whedon's Firefly have turned human future into a paranoiac's nightmare. And while faith in political bodies or larger collectives as such appears to have been irreversably shattered, the remaining fragments have been rearrangend to form something else. Something that in the end might easily prove to be the more powerful optimist vision: humanism displayed not under ideal circumstances but in the face of terror and, also, the firm belief in the individual's capability to change.

So, here is my reply to anybody accusing shows like Farscape, Babylon 5, DS9 or the later seasons of Buffy of too much bleakness: don't look at the amount of despair and gloom. Look into the hearts of the characters. And you will find hope for mankind. More than enough.

***

I finally saw the season premiere of Angel. After last years' fantasy-heavy and apocalypse-loaden story arcs, the episode itself felt rather refreshing and ironically also much closer to the earlier, more reality-based plolines of seasons 1 and 2 than anything that has happened to Angel and crew after Pylea. Go A-Team. Go!

***

Some TV shows are like your favourite sweater. Though worn-out, baggy and bleached, you will unconditionally love them till the very end. I missed you, ER. Great to have you back!
 
 
Current Mood: bouncybouncy
Current Music: Rolling Stones, Paint It Black
 
 
 
Cavendishcavendish on October 5th, 2003 10:18 am (UTC)
Random reply ;-)
Hi there!

First reaction: Oh no, not again ...
Second thought: Thank God, the keyboard survived ;-))
...

Thanks for the discussion on my entry, I appreciate it very much.
I did not really want to _accuse_ shows like Farscape, Babylon 5 or Buffy; especially not since I love most of them. (Well, actually, I hate to admit it, all of them to various degrees ;-) )I wanted to offer a point of discussion, which I seem to have managed. ;-). I agree with you as far as the shows mentioned above are concerned. I just looked at it from a different angle, I guess. (&I fear you are beginning to loose your general pessimist view of the world ;-)) beware)

Nevertheless, I do sincerely hope that this century will not enter the History Books as the post X-Files age ...

I too liked the season premier of Angel quite a lot - lets hope the show continues this way

& finally congratulations on you new icon. I wonder if this also goes for (fan-) critics and TV shows_ "Beware of the diagnostic droids" ;-)

F.
Selenaselenak on October 5th, 2003 12:44 pm (UTC)
Humanist values
I think DS9 pulled off a splendid compromise between post-X-Files paranoia and darkness and classic Trek optimism in regards to the human spirit. When Bashir, in the seventh season, is faced with a relentless "the end justifies the means" dogma from Federation officials (in the episode with the Latin title meaning "in times of war, law is silent"), and says "No", does not go along with it, we know he doesn't do this out of untried naive optimism. At this point, he's seen it all. His humanism consists of ethics tried and proven. And that is hope.
Hmpfhmpf on October 12th, 2003 04:40 pm (UTC)
And that is the only place that matters, anyway.
>So, here is my reply to anybody accusing shows like Farscape, Babylon 5, DS9 or the later seasons of Buffy of too much bleakness: don't look at the amount of despair and gloom. Look into the hearts of the characters. And you will find hope for mankind. More than enough.

Political utopias are often deceptive. ;-)