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19 March 2007 @ 08:42 am
PotC Drabble: "Water"  
To salute the astounding PotC drabbles sprouting all over my flist at the moment, here is a first one from me *g*

Prompt: Water
Characters: Weatherby Swann, James Norrington
Rating: PG
Word Count: 100

Lots of thanks to the kind folks at rough_magic who helped me to spot un-english phrasings :-)



WATER

After the spoiled, mirthless affair that was dinner, Weatherby manages to catch Lieutenant Norrington halfway up the stairs to one of those odd, separate decks whose names he can never remember. They all look the same, anyway. Crowded and cluttered patches of wood, barely large enough to give the illusion of space. Yes, a man might gaze at the skies from these places. But what is sky, what are stars against a vast, turmoiled ocean?

"Sir, the easiest way to your cabin -" Norrington starts.

"Actually I was looking for company," Weatherby says. "The sea...it makes me quite nervous."

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Molly Joyful: Grin like a gentlemanjoyful_molly on March 19th, 2007 12:31 pm (UTC)
one of those odd, separate decks whose names he can never remember

That's wonderful! Makes it very clear that Swann is actually a stranger in the micro cosmos of the ship; no wonder he's nervous. And he's very honest about looking for company, something Norrington (or any other officer, as for that!) would very likely never do.

This is the week of drabble-invasions, and I can't say I complain! ;)
Bimo: Terra_incognitabimo on March 20th, 2007 07:26 am (UTC)
That's wonderful! Makes it very clear that Swann is actually a stranger in the micro cosmos of the ship; no wonder he's nervous.

And the fun thing is that this is really little more than my own, personal ignorance of the "wooden world" transferred to poor old Papa Swann.*g* I originally wanted Swann and Norrington to meet on some specific deck just to add a bit of naval flair, but as soon as I began with my research I realised the rather confusing quality of nautical architecture and terms ;-)

And he's very honest about looking for company, something Norrington (or any other officer, as for that!) would very likely never do.

I guess that Norrington, stoic, stubborn, repressed and secretly romantic soul that he is, would rather walk the plank than publicly admit that he has his moments of loneliness, too ;-)

Swann, on the other hand, always struck me as being a true people's person whose ideal natural habitat is the salon.
sinningia: darling Jack Davenportsinningia on March 19th, 2007 02:46 pm (UTC)
So very sweet! I love Weatherby/Norrington-interaction and you got them spot-on, with so little words. Weatherby's ignorance of all things nautical is endearing^^

I really enjoyed this!

~sinningia~
Bimo: Terra_incognitabimo on March 20th, 2007 07:45 am (UTC)
Thanks for the lovely feedback :-)

I love Weatherby/Norrington-interaction

I'm really enjoying the dynamic between those two. So endearingly 'substitute father/substitute son' like, and definitely one of the many quiet and subtle things that makes CotBP worth re-watching.

Karenquiller77 on March 19th, 2007 03:24 pm (UTC)
Lovely.
Bimo: Terra_incognitabimo on March 20th, 2007 07:29 am (UTC)
Aw, thank you!

I'd never thought you'd read something related to 'Pirates of the Caribbean' ;-)

Oh, and my congratulations on the good news regarding your novel!
Karenquiller77 on March 20th, 2007 02:56 pm (UTC)
I loved PotC (the second movie not so much). I don't go looking for fanfic of any sort these days, much less write it. But it was right there, and it was short, and I've always likes your writing. In other words: too tempting to pass up. :-)
galadhir on March 19th, 2007 06:12 pm (UTC)
Poor old Weatherby, he does seem all at sea here :) And 'nervous' is a very Swann understatement, I think, for the kind of total shock to his world view implied in But what is sky, what are stars against a vast, turmoiled ocean? He's fortunate to have come across someone for whom it is a rational environment :)

Wonderful drabble!
Bimo: Terra_incognitabimo on March 20th, 2007 06:53 am (UTC)
Glad you enjoyed this :-)

Poor old Weatherby, he does seem all at sea here :)

Definitely. I like to think that the Dauntless is just about three or four days out off Portsmouth at this point, and that Weatherby, for the very first time, is beginning to realize what an incredible journey is lying ahead of him ;-)

Cavendishcavendish on March 19th, 2007 07:40 pm (UTC)
As I have said before, (and I do mean it ;-) ) I like this nice little *text*. The Atmosphere conveyed in this few *lines* is quite convincing and the the mix of angsty feelings and humor in the *short scene* makes the whole thing quite enjoyable to read.

There are, however, things that escape me: While I do have a vague idea that *Pot-C* is not a new kind of cooking gear, the word drabble is not part of my active vocabulary. Nor, as I had to find out, part of any dictionary in my possession.

There are such wonderful (and wonderfully simple) words to describe fictional texts; you'll find some of them in the above comment marked in *asterisks* And believe me, there are many more, and all of those can be quite fittingly and meaningfully applied to any kind of fictional text which includes, if I may say so, even literary text written by television or film fans with the aim to enrich the given cosmos the film industry has provided for them.

So why not for a change using them instead of fic / drabble / ficlet / or whatnot.

*please*? ;-)

Bimo: DRD_bewarebimo on March 20th, 2007 06:30 am (UTC)
Pah! Who needs dictionaries when there is a perfectly fine definition of 'drabble' at the wikipedia? ;-)

I have to agree though about fandom's tendency to distinguish itself from the rest of the world by coining and continually refining its own, rather odd kind of literary jargon. Reading the word 'fic', especially when it's used to refer to a 45.000 word short novella, regularly makes my hairs stand on end...
Cavendishcavendish on March 20th, 2007 06:59 pm (UTC)
oh dear, how could I be so ignorant as to consult the Websters


Main Entry: Drabble
Pronunciation: ‚dra-b„l
Function: biographical name

Margaret 1939–English novelist; wrote A Summer Bird-cage (1962), The Needle's Eye (1972), The Middle Ground (1980), etc.

Main Entry: drabble
Pronunciation: ‚dra-b„l
Function: verb
Inflected Form: drab£bled ; drabbling \-b(„-)liŠ\
Etymology: Middle English drabelen; akin to Low German drabbelen
Date: 15th century


transitive senses : draggle
intransitive senses : to become wet and muddy


how stupid of me, really
Dauntless: Norrington smilehms_dauntless on March 23rd, 2007 07:08 am (UTC)
Oh, very very lovely ! And more than that: this is perfect :)