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02 February 2013 @ 09:51 am
Django Unchained  
One of the movies I would never have seen, If Cavendish hadn't been so interested in viewing it and had sort of dragged me along. I can't help but to feel rather impressed, though, by how much actual, serious and thoughtworthy content this movie transports, apart from the splatter. Interesting comment on power dynamics, rather brilliant use of mythology (classical and modern myths alike), memorable visual imagery.

If one is able to stomach the blood&guts parts, the film is well worth seeing.

This entry was originally posted at http://bimo.dreamwidth.org/57101.html. Comment there or here, as you like. I'd be glad to reply to your comments over on DW.
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Current Mood: impressedimpressed
 
 
 
Kathyhkathyh on February 2nd, 2013 10:55 am (UTC)
I wish I could pluck up courage to see it but I've heard it's incredibly gory. I can't deal with too much blood and guts!
Bimo: Alex_Gene_mugbimo on February 2nd, 2013 02:21 pm (UTC)
I've heard it's incredibly gory

It is, I'm afraid. Right to the point where the amount of gore becomes rather surreal and absurd. It's not the over-the-top violence that makes parts of this movie difficult to watch, but rather the scenes in which Tarrantino gets serious and sympathetic towards the violence's victims. (The portrayal of violence in this movie varies strongly, depending whether it's directed against slave owners and/or criminals or the victims of slavery.
diotimah on April 3rd, 2013 09:52 pm (UTC)
I've heard it's incredibly gory

It is, I'm afraid.


Indeed. Just had the opportunity to see it this weekend, though, and can wholeheartedly recommend it. In many ways, it's the companion piece to Inglourious Basterds and a very clever, complex comment on slavery, American history and the ways in which it is still difficult for American society to deal with its own 'dark past'.
Bimo: Alex_Gene_mugbimo on April 6th, 2013 07:21 am (UTC)
very clever, complex comment on slavery, American history and the ways in which it is still difficult for American society to deal with its own 'dark past'.

Absolutely.

In many ways, it's the companion piece to Inglourious Basterds

My husband, who's seen Inglorious Basterds at least two or three times, says so as well.

I must admit, though, that I haven't made it through a full screening of this particular movie yet, mostly because I found myself unable to deal with the scenes involving the basterds team. No real idea, why. Maybe the comic style introduction, maybe the presence of Till Schweiger. But there's clearly something about these scenes that makes me feel as if Tarantino was violating the unspoken contract between cinemagoer and director.

The more rational part of my brain keeps telling me that from an artistic point of view this may actually be a very brilliant and truly intriguing thing, however I can't help feeling squicked.

Anyway, so glad to hear from you again. Please feel welcome to drop by anytime!:-)

Edited at 2013-04-06 07:21 am (UTC)